prosecutions

2nd June 2016

Derbyshire waste management company fined £300,000

A Derbyshire waste management and plant hire company has been fined £300,000 and ordered to pay costs of £50,737 after a worker was fatally crushed between two vehicles while refuelling. An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) into the incident, which occurred in 2013, found there were no marked or identified vehicle and pedestrian routes. There were no rules or control of reversing manoeuvres, and the lighting at the site was poor and below the required standard.

2nd June 2016

Energy company fined £1.75 Million

An energy company was fined £1.75 Million after a worker was seriously scalded at a power station when he opened a faulty valve which emitted high pressure, high temperature steam. He sustained serious burns to his chest and legs. An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) into the incident, which happened in 2013, found that the company was aware of the defect but did not ensure appropriate steps were taken to either repair or remove the valve from use.

1st June 2016

Telecommunications company has been fined £600,000

A telecommunications company has been fined £600,000 and ordered to pay costs of £60,000 following two, sequential, events when workers were injured by falls from height.

In the first incident an engineer, who was working on a stepladder installing a cable along a ceiling level cable tray amongst the lighting system, felt a pain in his right arm and fell from the step ladder. He was taken to hospital with head and back injuries. Later that day a second engineer continued with the work, from a different ladder, and he too fell to the ground and was taken to hospital with serious skull and back injuries.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) into both incidents, which occurred on 1st April 2010, found that the work had not been properly assessed or planned, despite workers being exposed to such serious risks as working at height close to an electrical system.